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Introduction

My work is primarily 3D character and creature modeling for games, tv and toy related projects. I spend a lot of time working with 3D software developers promoting their products and getting young talent into the industry. I have as much passion for training and development as I do for creating characters. Hence these tutorials and videos.

 Sketchbot by Steve Talkowski – A fantastic example of getting your ideas into 3D

For some time now I’ve been looking to do a series of tutorials to help 2D artists understand the process of getting their creations into 3D. Lots of traditional illustrators and designers who use vector based programs like adobe illustrator, want to get their designs into a more three dimensional medium, some times digital, sometimes into a sculpture via rapid prototyping. More and more we are seeing large companies using quirky little animations containing odd little characters that started life as pencil sketch in an artists sketchbook. I get lots of requests to actually model this sort of thing but I also get emails every week from artists wanting to learn how to do it themselves.

My work is primarily 3D character and creature modeling for games, tv and toy related projects. I spend a lot of time working with 3D software developers promoting their products and getting young talent into the industry. I have as much passion for training and development as I do for creating characters. Hence these tutorials and videos.

All too often an artist will attempt this sort of job by diving into a program like Maya, 3DSMax or Cinema 4D thinking that in a day or two they’ll have a finished product ready to animate. Like many things in life, If you take your time, learn all the steps along the way, avoid the pitfalls and put the required hours in, you’ll very quickly achieve your goal. Far too many of us dive in and then get distracted or put off  by the multitude of tools and menus. Or worse, start off wanting to model something and then get distracted by the amazing possibilities of animating a box or rigging a hand or messing with shiny metal materials.

 

I don’t intend to teach anyone how to use a specific program. I want to show how to approach a project and then allow the skill to be transferred to any 3D package. I always try to use more budget end software as lots of the artists I train are at the start of their career and don’t always have access to the more expensive tools. Also, the basic polygon skills can be applied to modeling in any of the major 3D packages. I like to use  Silo by Nevercenter for the core polygon modeling. Silo is a powerful modeler and very easy to learn. I use another amazing program called  Headus UVLayout for breaking down a model into its component parts and giving it UV co-ordinates to allow textures to be added (I’ll explain this more later).I use Maxons Cinema 4D for a lot of work. Not the cheapest solution on the market but it is well known in the design world and has lots of powerful tools that are easy to teach.

 

I may also mention Pixologics ZBrush in the tutorials as it is one of the most powerful high polygon sculpting solutions on the market.

Having said all that the software that you use is largely irrelevant. As mentioned already, most of the things I talk about can be done in lots of different ways in lots of packages. The key thing is that an artist understands the underlying principals of sub-division modeling. I did a series of free modeling tutorials using Silo. If you want to pick up some of the basics before looking at these toy projects then try out the Minotaur videos and the Alien Head videos from Nevercenters tutorial site.

The core purpose of this website is to show how you can take a basic character design (toys, creatures, vector characters etc.) then break the process down, step by step from that 2D concept to final render.

Next step, take a look at the basics  page.

 

Enter3D | The basics The projects